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SF review: “To Die A Stranger” by Jilly Paddock

Jilly Paddock’s novel-length story has been on my “to read” list ever since I read her excellent “The Spook and the Spirit in the Stone”. The “spook” of that off-world crime thriller is a creepy “agent-pair”, an intriguing concept of a Terran spy with super-human psi powers. I wanted to know exactly what is an “agent-pair”?

“To Die A Stranger” provides the answer by taking us to near the start of the development on Earth of “agent-pairs” – the linking of humans with strong psi capabilities with AI units – at the Delany Computer Corporation, a manufacturer of advanced computers which is working on a secret programme for the Terran government.

All this is not really a spoiler, since this information comes out relatively early in following the life of Anna-Marie Delany, daughter of the owner of the Delany corporation, and who also lives a pretend life as Amaranth, a holo-drama actress. There is a nice teaser in the intro to Part 1: “…and this is the story of her death.” We then go into Anna-Marie’s first person narrative.

Based on “The Spook” and the intro I had been expecting another crime thriller but, while the story has some of these elements, this story is more an entertaining “space opera”. Following a horrific air-car crash, Anna-Marie, disfigured and with her acting alter-ego killed off, becomes linked to a recalcitrant AI manufactured by her father’s firm and the story becomes a chase thriller, with our protagonists hassled by a shadowy Earth Intelligence unit, full of dirty tricks. The pursuit then takes up most of the rest of the story, moving swiftly from Earth to planets in other parts of the galaxy.

The way the psi powers work and the easy interstellar travel combined with the whole traditional SF tone of the story reminds me of some of the SF romps from the 1950s and 1960s. Its style feels to me not as if written by Isaac Asimov but rather as in the tradition of stories by Eric Frank Russell, who had a light touch and more humour in his tales. This is not a criticism, I thoroughly enjoyed Russell’s work, which I consider to have been under-rated.

In conclusion, recommended as a light but good traditional escapist SF story. It is available for download through Amazon UK:
Jilly Paddock – To Die A Stranger
Or, in Amazon USA:
Jilly Paddock – To Die A Stranger

So now, having found out about Agent-Pairs, I’m waiting for the next Afton and Jerome story!

1 Comment so far

  1. Mike Keyton February 26th, 2013 8:13 pm

    Thanks for the heads-up on this writer. Maybe she’ll do a Rack interview for me. Wouldn’t mind reading her books, too. My WIP, Ceres, has a darker relationship between AI and the ‘Augmented’.

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